A product quality inspection

Table of content

  • PREPARING FOR INSPECTION
  • CHECKING PRODUCTION STATUS
  • RANDOM SAMPLING
  • INSPECTING
  • CHECKING PACKAGING DETAILS
  • VISUAL INSPECTION AND DIMENSIONS
  • ON-SITE TESTING
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PREPARING FOR INSPECTION

Before any inspection takes place, expectations need to be managed. There are two essential steps for this to happen:

CHECKING PRODUCTION STATUS

An important part of the product inspection process, every product inspection should begin with checking the production status. If, for example, the buyer expects their order to ship in three days, and the inspector discovers the order is far from finished, this insight would be valuable information to provide. Part of being the buyer’s “eyes and ears” in the factory is checking whether manufacturing is on schedule or if delays should be expected.

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RANDOM SAMPLING

Unless inspecting 100 percent of an order, you’re probably going to base your results on the findings of a sample of units checked. At this point, you should have selected a sampling plan, such as a standard AQL level or another customized plan.

INSPECTING

After the cartons are sampled and brought to the inspection area, the actual inspection can begin. Many experienced inspectors have their own protocol and procedures that they’ll run for particular products. They’ll use these and any requirements provided by you, to carry out the following:

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CHECKING PACKAGING DETAILS

There are many aspects of packaging that need to be checked during inspection. Carton packing, retail packaging, and shipping packaging all have their own style.

VISUAL INSPECTION AND DIMENSIONS

Visual inspection involves checking the appearance and dimensions of the product, as well as verifying that any necessary accessories are included. Inspectors must be certain that they’ve pulled an even number of units from each carton taken earlier. They should compare the units taken from production with the approved sample, if provided, and your specifications.product inspection process

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ON-SITE TESTING

An often more technical aspect of the product inspection process is on-site testing. On-site testing can vary quite a bit from product to product. Some tests are more generic procedures which are applicable to more than one product type. The Hi-Pot test, for example, is fairly standard for most electronic products. The carton drop test can be done on any product with a shipping carton.